Ed Oh: Remote

March 10 – April 14, 2024

Reception for the Artist
Sunday, March 10, 4:00 – 7:00 P.M.

Remote, 2023-24, installation view.

Remote expands Oh’s research into gaming technologies, communication networks, and value systems through a series of new drawings and sculptural installations. The exhibition excavates the poetics of the term “remote,” framing the PC bahng[1]—an archetypal cybercafé that emerged in South Korea during the 1990s—as a site that removes distances and time from social exchanges. Offering the possibility of immersion within a virtual world while in the presence of others, the PC bahng fosters a unique form of sociality premised on simultaneous isolation and connectivity, signaling a radical shift from artist café cultures of centuries past.

Oh explores Neolithic to neoliberal horizons through sculptural gestures and assemblage: carved bones stand in for controllers, hemp fibers contour messy cord systems, and graphite drawings—rudimentary forms of communication technology and the basis of artmaking—simulate computer screens. Capturing digital landscapes generated by the StarCraft[2]  game engine, Oh’s gridded drawings are structured like a photographer’s contact sheet and reminiscent of data, seemingly empirical and unbiased in presentation. The grid also organizes a series of keyboard sculptures, upon which Korean-English stickers form text-based compositions. These configurations of characters visualize mistranslations between languages, which accumulate through rapid and repetitive communication between devices. 

A constellation of gaming terminals constructed with found objects and drawing, Remote captures a once emergent form of network culture within a state of flux, playing with the cycles of capitalist time that insist upon newness, produce waste, and render commodities obsolete.


[1]   “PC Bahngs resemble cybercafés in many other countries, as they typically offer a cheap, high-speed Internet connection. But here, instead of sending e-mail or watching YouTube, most kids play online games either by themselves or in a more social atmosphere. Kids—boys, mostly—sneak out from under the watchful eye of their parents to put in an hour or three blasting away at virtual enemies across the room, across the country, or across the globe.”


Excerpt from The Internet of Elsewhere, Cyrus Farivar, https://books.apple.com/us/book/the-internet-of-elsewhere/id991172900, This material may be protected by copyright..

[2]  “STARCRAFT IS KNOWN AS A REAL-TIME strategy game, in which players must collect resources, build military units, and seek out their opponent in the game’s online map.”

Excerpt from The Internet of Elsewhere, Cyrus Farivar, https://books.apple.com/us/book/the-internet-of-elsewhere/id991172900, This material may be protected by copyright..